Author Archives: The Quantum Realist

The Quantum Catechism

Over recent years much has been said about the similarities between religion and science.  Religion and science, and especially physics, it are said are on a convergent path.  The religious establishment is particularly fond of this idea, especially when spoken by a scientist, since it enhances their credibility, bolsters their position of authority and helps recruit […]

Olber’s Paradox

Olber’s paradox dates back to the 16th century and is often cited as evidence to support the idea that the universe had a finite beginning in the form of a Big Bang.  The paradox concerns the idea that a dark night sky conflicts with the idea that the universe is infinite, eternal and static.   It is named after […]

The GUTs of the Matter

Scientists have long sought to show that various different forces of nature are in fact just different manifestations of a single common force.  It is felt that by doing so it will offer insights into the way the universe works and produce a much simpler model. The pressure to simplify our understanding of the universe […]

Relativity and Orbital Motion or How to win at the Game of Monopoly Using Special Relativity

The Muon is a small electrically charged particle, much like an electron only more massive.  Muons are especially useful when it comes to testing and measuring the effects of special relativity. This comes about for a number of reasons.  Firstly the muon carries an electric charge, which means that it can be manipulated by means […]

Not so sure about the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle?

Werner Heisenberg (1901 – 1976) was a German physicist who studied physics and mathematics in Munich.  He studied under Arnold Sommerfeld alongside Wolfgang Pauli, but it was when he first met Niels Bohr that his interest in quantum physics and his career took off. In 1926 he was working on a way to explain the […]

Particles that wave or waves that particle?

What the Michelson Morley experiment really shows, and what most modern theories fail to recognise, is that empty space is incapable of supporting a wave.  The fact that there is no ether means that all that is left which can support a wave is material and material, be it matter or antimatter is made of […]

An experiment to determine whether the universe is expanding

In the 19th century the German physicist Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) discovered that the solar spectrum contains a number of dark bands.  Fraunhofer made a detailed study of the wavelengths of these lines and later it was discovered independently by Bunsen and Kirchhoff that each chemical element has a characteristic set of these so called […]