Tag Archives: Planck’s constant

Some thoughts on unification of quantum and classical mechanics

Anselm of Aosta was a Benedictine monk in the 11th Century who rose through the ranks of the church to become Archbishop of Canterbury and eventually a Saint.  Anselm thought that belief in God was more than just an article of faith but was also rational. He sought to prove the existence of God by […]

How far is it around the earth?

How far is it around the earth? More specifically, if I was to set off from here in Wokingham following a great circle route, how far would I have to travel before I found myself back here in Wokingham? Well, if you look it up on Google the circumference of the earth is near enough […]

The Rydberg Constant and Rydberg Series

Here I take a look at the Rydberg formula in more detail and derive the Rydberg series, which is useful in calculating the change in energy level between any two states of the hydrogen atom and can be used to generate all of the other series:  Lyman, Balmer, Paschen, Brackett, Pfund, Humphreys etc.  I go […]

Louis de Broglie

Louis de Broglie

Prince Louis Victor Pierre Raymond de Broglie was born in Dieppe on August 15th 1892.  De Broglie first studied history, but developed an interest in physics as a result of working with his older brother Maurice.  Maurice had been a naval officer where he worked on early radio systems for ship to ship and ship […]

The Schrödinger Wave Equation

Following Bohr’s model for the hydrogen atom Louis de Broglie suggested that the electron could be considered as a wave rather than a particle and proposed that the wavelength of such a wave was Planck’s constant divided by the linear momentum of the orbiting electron.   In effect he was restating Bohr’s adopted assumption that angular […]

The Quantum Catechism

Over recent years much has been said about the similarities between religion and science.  Religion and science, and especially physics, it are said are on a convergent path.  The religious establishment is particularly fond of this idea, especially when spoken by a scientist, since it enhances their credibility, bolsters their position of authority and helps recruit […]

Particles that wave or waves that particle?

What the Michelson Morley experiment really shows, and what most modern theories fail to recognise, is that empty space is incapable of supporting a wave.  The fact that there is no ether means that all that is left which can support a wave is material and material, be it matter or antimatter is made of […]