Tag Archives: special relativity

Some thoughts on unification of quantum and classical mechanics

Anselm of Aosta was a Benedictine monk in the 11th Century who rose through the ranks of the church to become Archbishop of Canterbury and eventually a Saint.  Anselm thought that belief in God was more than just an article of faith but was also rational. He sought to prove the existence of God by […]

How far is it around the earth?

How far is it around the earth? More specifically, if I was to set off from here in Wokingham following a great circle route, how far would I have to travel before I found myself back here in Wokingham? Well, if you look it up on Google the circumference of the earth is near enough […]

A Mechanistic Model for the Hydrogen Atom

  Introduction The quantisation of matter and of electric charge are simple concepts to grasp since they involve merely the absence or presence of a integer number of discrete particles.  Particles, like grains of sand, can simply be counted to give the total amount of matter in any given volume.  Electric charge is only a […]

The Rydberg Constant and Rydberg Series

Here I take a look at the Rydberg formula in more detail and derive the Rydberg series, which is useful in calculating the change in energy level between any two states of the hydrogen atom and can be used to generate all of the other series:  Lyman, Balmer, Paschen, Brackett, Pfund, Humphreys etc.  I go […]

Louis de Broglie

Louis de Broglie

Prince Louis Victor Pierre Raymond de Broglie was born in Dieppe on August 15th 1892.  De Broglie first studied history, but developed an interest in physics as a result of working with his older brother Maurice.  Maurice had been a naval officer where he worked on early radio systems for ship to ship and ship […]

Relativity and Orbital Motion or How to win at the Game of Monopoly Using Special Relativity

The Muon is a small electrically charged particle, much like an electron only more massive.  Muons are especially useful when it comes to testing and measuring the effects of special relativity. This comes about for a number of reasons.  Firstly the muon carries an electric charge, which means that it can be manipulated by means […]

Particles that wave or waves that particle?

What the Michelson Morley experiment really shows, and what most modern theories fail to recognise, is that empty space is incapable of supporting a wave.  The fact that there is no ether means that all that is left which can support a wave is material and material, be it matter or antimatter is made of […]

How is it possible to make nothing out of something?

There is a fundamental conflict between the currently accepted interpretation of Maxwell’s equations and the absence of an ether like medium. Maxwell’s equations purport to show that a changing magnetic field induces an electric field and a changing electric field induces a magnetic field.  Taken together these two coupled fields oscillate and the whole propagates […]

Hydrogenic Atoms and the Bohr Model

As we move up the periodic table atoms get heavier. They do so because the nuclei of heavier atoms contain more protons.  In addition to the protons these heavier nuclei also contain another type of particle; the neutron, roughly equal in mass to the proton, but itself electrically neutral. So while the hydrogen atom comprises […]

Shedding some light on the nature of the photon

Visible light is just a small part of a much of a much broader spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, ranging from radio waves at one end through microwaves, visible light and X Rays to gamma rays at the other end of the spectrum. All of these different and seemingly diverse types of radiation are the various […]